Guide to Keybase encrypted directories

This is a guide to using Keybase‘s encrypted directories to store and share files.

If you have the Keybase client installed on your computer, you have a FUSE partition used to store any directories you may want to access. On a Linux system, this partition is mounted in the /keybase directory.

This partition is encrypted and syncronized with the Keybase servers. Keybase has three categories of directories: public, private, and team.

Public directories

Every Keybase user has a public directory. As you can guess, the contents of this directory is public. If you want to see the contents of yours, you can check it locally, here’s mine:

Alternatively, Keybase has set up a website where all public directories are accessible. You can see the contents of mine at https://keybase.pub/laitdebanane/.

Private directories

Unlike public directories, private directories are not accessible by anyone they are not meant for. You can have a private directory just to yourself, as well as directories shared with other users.

Your own private directory

Accessing your private directory is pretty straightforward. Here is how I access mine:

Shared private directories

To share a private directory with another Keybase user, you do not need to create it. Keybase manages these directories seamlessly. Let’s say I wanted to share a directory with the user foo, I would need to access the directory /keybase/private/laitdebanane,foo/. If I also wanted to share with bar, I would access /keybase/private/laitdebanane,foo,bar/.

Team directories

Keybase now supports teams. Here at Adaltas, we have our own team: adaltas. This means I can share files with everyone at the company by putting them in the /keybase/team/adaltas/ directory.

Subteam directories

Keybase also supports subteams, which means that our consultants working for Adaltas Marocco can create a adaltas.ma subteam and share files with each other in the /keybase/team/adaltas.ma/directory.

Username aliases

Sometimes you want to reference a user but you don’t know their Keybase username. Keybase implements aliases for this. For instance, I have linked my GitHub account to my Keybase account. This means you can access my public Keybase directory by replacing my username laitdebanane with surgicalbanana@github (both usernames are the same, so this may not be the most impressive example).

Username aliases don’t seem to work perfectly though. I have been getting an error when trying to access /keybase/public/arthur.busser@facebook/. It does not seem aliases work at all on the https://keybase.pub website.

By |2018-06-21T10:54:27+00:00June 18th, 2018|Categories: Data Governance|Tags: , , |0 Comments

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